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“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows” Gets the Honest Trailer Treatment

It’s fair to say that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, was a lot worse than the first movie. Honest Trailers often seems so flat out mean to movies when it points the finger at their faults but this one is about as accurate as it can be since the second movie had some great effects but those couldn’t help the story line that was almost desperate in its delivery. One big issue is that while it did bring in more characters, finally, it did so in a way that really showcases how the writers either didn’t grow

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows” Gets the Honest Trailer Treatment
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows’ Honest Trailer: Can We Go Back to the Rubber Suits?

‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows’ Honest Trailer: Can We Go Back to the Rubber Suits?
The first film in the rebooted Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles franchise may have gotten everything wrong about the heroes in a half-shell, likely thanks to Michael Bay’s involvement, but Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon tried to make it better by delivering a sequel that was more faithful to the animated series. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out […]

The post ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows’ Honest Trailer: Can We Go Back to the Rubber Suits? appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Hulu releases a Thanksgiving promo for Marvel’s Runaways

Coinciding with its season premiere, Hulu has released a holiday promo for its Marvel series Runaways which sees Alex (Rhenzy Feliz), Nico (Lyrica Okano), Chase (Gregg Sulkin), Gert (Ariela Barer), Molly (Allegra Acosta), and Karolina (Virginia Gardner) ‘enjoy’ a Thanksgiving meal together; check it out below…

See Also: Check out our review of the first four episodes of Marvel’s Runaways here

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Marvel’s Runaways gets two new promo posters

With just a week to go until its season premiere, Hulu has released another couple of promo posters for its upcoming Marvel series Runaways featuring Alex (Rhenzy Feliz), Nico (Lyrica Okano), Chase (Gregg Sulkin), Gert (Ariela Barer), Molly (Allegra Acosta), and Karolina (Virginia Gardner); take a look at the posters here…

See Also: Check out our review of the first four episodes of Marvel’s Runaways here

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

New character posters for Marvel’s Runaways

Following yesterday’s banner [check it out here], Hulu has released six new posters for the upcoming Marvel series Runaways; take a look at the posters here…

See Also: Check out our review of the first four episodes of Marvel’s Runaways here

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean, Allegra Acosta (100 Things to do Before High School) as Molly Hernandez, Ryan Sands (Hat Hair, The Wire) as Geoffrey Wilder, Angel Parker (The People v.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Marvel’s Runaways gets a new banner

With less than two weeks to go until the season premiere of Runaways, a new banner has been revealed for Hulu’s upcoming Marvel series featuring Gert (Ariela Barer), Molly (Allegra Acosta), Alex (Rhenzy Feliz), Nico (Lyrica Okano), Chase (Gregg Sulkin), and Karolina (Virginia Gardner); take a look below…

See Also: Check out our review of the first four episodes of Marvel’s Runaways here

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Megan Fox Opens Up About Lack of 'Morality or Integrity' in Hollywood

Megan Fox Opens Up About Lack of 'Morality or Integrity' in Hollywood
Megan Fox is getting candid about what goes on behind-the-scenes in Hollywood.

The 31-year-old actress opened up about the lack of "morality" and "integrity" within the industry in a new interview with Hong Kong's Prestige magazine released this week.

"There are some very dark, negative things that go on on-set, between actors or between actors and directors -- specifically to actresses -- that we have to go through," Fox tells the publication. "There's no morality or integrity within the studio system. It’s completely about greed."

On her part, Fox says "if there was a way to change that, I, of course, would."

Related: Megan Fox Opens Up About Being Fired From ‘Transformers:' 'I Really Thought I was Joan of Arc'

"It creates a lot of emotional trauma. People have to go through this crap over and over again because your humanity isn’t even recognized. You’re an object, a means to an end
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Olivia Thirlby, Alan Ritchson & Megan Fox Star In ‘Shadow Girl’ — Afm

Olivia Thirlby, Alan Ritchson & Megan Fox Star In ‘Shadow Girl’ — Afm
Olivia Thirlby (The Stanford Prison Experiment), Alan Ritchson (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows), Megan Fox (Transformers franchise), and Jim Gaffigan (Chappaquiddick) are set to star in Shadow Girl, a magic realist tale written and directed by Claudia Myers. Set in a timeless metropolis, the pic follows Holly who has faded to the point of becoming invisible and must find her way back into the world. Maria Dizzia (Orange is the New Black) and former Ufc…
See full article at Deadline »

Marvel’s Runaways gets a new trailer

With a little over four weeks to go until the season premiere of Runaways, a new trailer has arrived online for Hulu’s Marvel series, which we have for you here…

See Also: Jeph Loeb on why Hulu was the right fit for Marvel’s Runaways

See Also: First images from Marvel’s Runaways TV series

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean, Allegra Acosta (100 Things to do Before High School) as Molly Hernandez,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Jeph Loeb on why Hulu was the right fit for Marvel’s Runaways

Marvel has been busy the past several years spreading out across the television landscape. What started on ABC with shows like Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. eventually led to a steady influx of properties adapted for Netflix in the form of Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Iron Fist, The Defenders and the upcoming Punisher series. Now, the Marvel Universe is making its debut on the Hulu streaming service with Marvel’s Runaways.

So why Hulu? Recently, comic legend Jeph Loeb spoke at New York Comic Con 2017 (via Screenrant) about why Hulu was the right home for Runaways:

“What we do with every show is we look at where the best place is. We absolutely had a lot on our plate at Netflix, but wasn’t the reason for it. We were very excited about the possibility of joining a network that was young and growing in the same way
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch the first teaser trailer for Marvel’s Runaways

Ahead of its panel later this evening at New York Comic-Con, Hulu has released a teaser trailer for its upcoming Marvel series Runaways; check it out here…

See Also: First images from Marvel’s Runaways TV series

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean, Allegra Acosta (100 Things to do Before High School) as Molly Hernandez, Ryan Sands (Hat Hair, The Wire) as Geoffrey Wilder, Angel Parker (The People v.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

First images from Marvel’s Runaways TV series

A batch of first-look images have arrived online for Hulu’s upcoming Marvel series The Runaways featuring our young heroes and their parents, the supervillain cabal known as The Pride. Check them out here…

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

Runaways is set to premiere on November 21st and features a cast that includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean, Allegra Acosta (100 Things to do Before High School) as Molly Hernandez, Ryan Sands (Hat Hair, The Wire) as Geoffrey Wilder, Angel Parker (The People v. Oj Simpson: American Crime Story,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Marvel’s Runaways casts Julian McMahon

It looks like Julian McMahon will be returning to the Marvel universe. The actor has been cast in Marvel’s upcoming Hulu series Runaways as a man named Jonah. While his origins and ultimate intentions are unknown, McMahon will be a pivotal player in the Runaways’ rebellion against their parents.

“We’re incredibly excited to add Julian to our exceptional cast and we can’t wait to see what he brings to the world of Marvel’s Runaways,” said Executive Producers and Showrunners Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage.

McMahon is known for his roles in Nip/Tuck and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency, but Marvel fans will also know him as Victor Von Doom, better known as Doctor Doom, in Fantastic Four and its sequel Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer.

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Alibaba Pictures appoints Fan Luyuan as CEO

Alibaba Pictures appoints Fan Luyuan as CEO
Alibaba Pictures has invested in Star Trek Beyond and Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation.

Alibaba Pictures, the entertainment arm of the e-commerce giant, has appointed Fan Luyuan as CEO, replacing Yu Yongfu.

Fan previously held several posts at Alibaba Group’s digital payment platform, Alipay, most recently senior vice president. He was also president of Alipay Business Unit and the Wealth Management Business Unit at Alibaba’s Ant Financial Services Group.

Joining Alibaba in 2007, Fan was also involved in the launch of Yu’e Bao, an online investment service that operates similarly to crowd-funding platforms and has been involved in financing Chinese films. He has also been an executive director of Alibaba Pictures since its launch and is the founder of Alibaba’s cinema ticketing platform, Tao Piao Piao.

Yu continues in his role as chairman and CEO of Alibaba Digital Media and Entertainment Group. At the recent Shanghai International Film Festival, Yu told the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Five Roles You Totally Forgot Stephen Amell Played

Dashing Canadian actor Stephen Amell is best known for his role as Oliver Queen in “Green Arrow” in the Arrowverse. The show was based on the famous comic book character. He also made a name for himself in the role of Casey Jones in the hit “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows” (2016). He has an unforgettable face which is familiar to most younger people, but most have forgotten about the other roles that he played earlier in his career. Here are five roles that you totally forgot Stephen Amell played. Billy in “Rent-a-Goalie” Few people seem to

Five Roles You Totally Forgot Stephen Amell Played
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Marvel’s Runaways gets a November premiere date

Last week we got a look at a leaked trailer for Runaways, the upcoming Marvel series from Hulu, and now while we await an official release, TV Line brings word that the show is set to premiere on Tuesday, November 21st.

Other premiere dates announced by Hulu inlcude The Mindy Project season six (Tuesday, September 12th), Chance season two (Wednesday, October 11th), Freakish season two (Wednesday, October 18th), Future Man (Tuesday, November 14th), the final of East Los High (Friday, December 1st) and Shut Eye season 2 (Wednesday, December 6th).

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

The cast of Runaways includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Pete's Dragon Director David Lowery Wants To Make a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Movie

I am not a big fan of the most recent live-action/CG Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movies. In my opinion, they were awful. If you disagree with me, that's cool. I know some people enjoyed the films. I just wasn't one of them.

Personally, I wouldn't care to see any more Tmnt movies made from this franchise. But, I would be open to a complete reboot with a talented director at the helm! Did you see the live-action adaptation of Pete's Dragon? it was a wonderful film! Well, the guy who made that, David Lowery, is actually interested in making a Tmnt movie.

During a recent interview with Uproxx, Lowery talks about Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze and says he would make a Ninja Turtles movie if given the opportunity.

"I would do a Ninja Turtles movie … I thought Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Watch the leaked teaser trailer for Marvel’s Runaways

We’ve got our first look at Hulu’s Runaways thanks to a leaked teaser trailer for the upcoming Marvel series, which sees our six teen heroes – Nico Minoru, Karolina Dean, Molly Hayes, Chase Stein, Alex Wilder and Gertrude Yorkes – discovering that their parents belong to a criminal cabal known as The Pride, and even features a brief tease of Old Lace! Check it out here while you can…

Every teenager thinks their parents are evil. What if you found out they actually were? Marvel’s Runaways is the story of six diverse teenagers who can barely stand each other but who must unite against a common foe–their parents.

The cast of Runaways includes Ariela Barer (New Girl) as Gert Yorkes, Lyrica Okano (The Affair) as Nico Minoru, Rhenzy Feliz (Teen Wolf) as Alex Wilder, Gregg Sulkin (Anti-Social) as Chase Stein, Virginia Gardner (Goat) as Karolina Dean, Allegra Acosta
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Why Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever

Why Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever
A few days ago, my colleague Owen Gleiberman wrote a scathing essay questioning whether Colin Trevorrow was the right choice to direct “Star Wars: Episode IX,” suggesting that the “Jurassic World” helmer’s in-between indie, “The Book of Henry,” is such an abomination we have reason to think he could ruin the franchise that has already weathered the likes of Gungans and Ewoks.

It was a tough essay, so much so that I genuinely feared Trevorrow’s job could be in danger. And then a funny thing happened. “Star Wars” producer Kathleen Kennedy fired the directors on a completely different “Star Wars” movie, axing Phil Lord and Christopher Miller from the Han Solo project. What!?!?

The universe needs directors like Lord and Miller more than ever these days — and not just the “Star Wars” universe, mind you, but the multiverse of cinematic storytelling in general. Lord and Miller represent that rarest of breeds: directors with a fresh and unique vision, backed by the nerve to stand up for what they believe in.

Related

Star Wars’ Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Fired After Clashing With Kathleen Kennedy (Exclusive)

Just look at their track record: After starting their careers as TV writers (they created the MTV cartoon series “Clone High” and wrote for “How I Met Your Mother”), the duo made their feature directorial debut with “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs,” a wildly imaginative reinvention of a 32-page children’s book that heralded them as bold, outside-the-box comedy storytellers.

Then they made the jump to live-action, bringing their trademark brand of hip, pop-savvy self-awareness to the feature-length “21 Jump Street” remake. Few animation directors have survived the leap from animation to live-action (just consider the likes of “John Carter” and “Monster Trucks”), but Lord and Miller took to the new medium like naturals (technically, they had experience from their TV writing days — and I remember hearing stories that they’d actually taken a break from “Cloudy” to write an episode of “How I Met Your Mother” just so they wouldn’t lose their Writers Guild insurance benefits, but that’s another story about animators don’t enjoy the same protection in this industry).

“21 Jump Street” took the concept of a tired old ’80s TV show — two baby-faced cops go undercover as high-school students — and rebooted it with a playful twist, turning the ludicrous setup into one giant joke. Then came “The Lego Movie,” in which they cracked one of the weirdest assignments in 21st-century filmmaking — bring the popular line of kids toys to life — in a wholly original way, embracing the fact that Legos had spawned an almost cult-like sub-genre of fan films (to capitalize on the trend, the Lego company had even released a “MovieMaker Set” in 2000, complete with stop-motion camera and Steven Spielberg-styled minifigure) to make the ultimate wisecracking meta-movie.

After that string of successes, Lord and Miller had become two of the hottest names in town, able to pick their projects. But like so many directors of their generation — children of the ’70s whose love of cinema had been inspired by George Lucas’ game-changing space opera, what they wanted was to make a “Star Wars” movie. For a moment, that seemed possible, since the producers were hiring indie directors like Rian Johnson (“Brick”) and Gareth Edwards (“Monsters”) to helm these tentpoles.

On paper, Lord and Miller’s irreverent sensibility seemed like a perfect match for Han Solo, the franchise’s most sardonic character. One has to assume that it was precisely that take Kathy Kennedy and the “Star Wars” producers wanted when they hired the duo. But this is where modern critics, columnists and the fan community at large fail to understand a fundamental change that is happening at the blockbuster level in Hollywood: These directors are not being chosen to put their personal stamp on these movies. They are being hired to do the opposite, to suppress their identity and act grateful while the producers make all the key creative decisions.

Want to know why Trevorrow was picked to direct “Jurassic World” when his only previous credit was a nifty little sci-fi indie called “Safety Not Guaranteed”? It’s because he plays well with others, willing to follow exec producer Steven Spielberg’s lead when necessary. Going in to the assignment, Trevorrow had no experience directing complicated action sequences or overseeing massive-budget special effects. He didn’t need it, because those aspects of the movie were delegated to seasoned heads of department, while Trevorrow focused on what he does best: handling the interpersonal chemistry between the lead characters. (Personally, I hold Trevorrow responsible for the decision to film Bryce Dallas Howard running in high heels, but not the turducken-like gag where a giant CG monosaur rises up to swallow the pterodactyl that’s eating Bryce’s assistant. Surely someone else oversaw that nearly-all-digital sequence.)

Independent schlock producer Roger Corman memorably observed that in the post-“Jaws,” post-“Star Wars” era, the A movies have become the B movies, and the B movies have become the A movies — which is another way of saying that today, instead of taking risks on smart original movies for grown-up sensibilities (say, tony literary adaptations and films based on acclaimed Broadway plays), the studios are investing most of their resources into comic-book movies and the equivalent of cliffhanger serials (from Tarzan to Indiana Jones).

To Corman’s equation I would add the following corollary: On today’s tentpoles, the director’s job is to take orders, while producers and other pros are called in to oversee the complicated practical and CG sequences that ultimately define these movies. It’s an extension of the old second-unit model, wherein experienced stunt and action-scene professionals handled the logistics of car chases and exotic location work — except that now, such spectacular sequences are the most important part of effects-driven movies. Meanwhile, the one ingredient the producers can’t fake or figure out on their own is the human drama, which is the reason that directors of Sundance films keep getting handed huge Hollywood movies: to deliver the chemistry that will make audiences care about all those big set pieces.

How times have changed: In the 1980s, the only one who would make a movie like “Fantastic Four” was Corman, which he did for peanuts, whereas two years ago, Fox dumped more than $125 million into the same property. And the director they picked? Josh Trank, whose only previous feature had been the low-budget “Chronicle.” Let’s not forget that Trank ankled his own “Star Wars” spinoff, which I suspect had everything to do with realizing what happens when forced to relinquish control of a project in which he’s listed as the in-title-only director.

Back in the ’60s, a group of French critics writing for Cahiers du Cinéma coined what has come to be known as “the auteur theory,” a relatively quaint idea that the director (as opposed the screenwriter, star or some other creative contributor) is the “author” of a film. In the half-century since, critics everywhere have fallen for this fantastical notion that directors have creative autonomy over the movies they make — when in fact, as often as not, that simply isn’t the case.

The auteur theory makes for a convenient myth, of course, and one that lazy critics have long perpetuated, because it’s much to difficult to give credit where it’s due when confronted with the already-cooked soufflé of a finished movie. Critics aren’t allowed into the kitchen, after all, and though countless chefs (or heads of department, to clarify the metaphor) contribute to any given film production, it’s virtually impossible to identify who was really responsible for the choices that make the film what it is.

How much of “Citizen Kane’s” creative genius can be attributed to cinematographer Gregg Toland? Would “Jaws” or “Star Wars” have been even half as effective without composer John Williams? Did editor Ralph Rosenblum save “Annie Hall”? And most relevant to the discussion at hand: Is it correct to think of “Rebecca” as an Alfred Hitchcock movie (he directed it, after all), or does the result more thoroughly reflect the hand of producer David O. Selznick?

This is all complicated by the fact that an entire class of filmmakers — the so-called “film-school generation” — seized upon the auteur theory, turning it into something of a self-fulfilling prophecy, as the likes of Coppola, Scorsese, Spielberg, Lucas and so on left their signature on the movies they made. Meanwhile, the Cahiers critics (several of whom went on to become directors, among them Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut) were protected by a uniquely French copyright law dating back to the 18th century, known as the “droit d’auteur,” which entitled them to final cut (a privilege precious few Hollywood directors have).

But these remain the exception, not the rule. In the case of the “Jurassic Park” and “Star Wars” franchises, the director is decidedly not the auteur. To the extent that a single vision forms the creative identity of these films, it’s almost always the producer we should hold responsible. To understand that, we need only look back to the original “Star Wars” sequel, “The Empire Strikes Back,” a movie “directed” by Irvin Kershner, but every bit George Lucas’ brainchild (he reportedly hand-picked Kershner for his strength with character development). The same goes for Richard Marquand on “Return of the Jedi.”

This shouldn’t be a scandalous revelation. It just doesn’t fit with the self-aggrandizing narrative that many directors have chosen for themselves. Yes, the 1989 “Batman” is without question “a Tim Burton movie”: Burton has such an incredibly distinctive aesthetic, and the personality to push it through a system that’s virtually designed to thwart such originality. But when it comes to the incredibly successful “X-Men” franchise, there’s no question that producer (and “Superman” director) Richard Donner deserves as much credit as those first two films’ director, Bryan Singer. Simply put, that franchise owes its personality to both of their involvement.

But when it comes to “Jurassic World,” that movie probably wouldn’t look much different in the hands of someone other than Trevorrow. And the same can almost certainly be said for the “Star Wars” movie he’s been hired to direct, because in both cases, it’s the producers who are steering the ship. When the stakes are this high, it would be downright reckless to give complete autonomy to relatively unproven directors.

That’s increasingly the case in Hollywood these days. Director Dave Green (who’d made a tiny Amblin-style movie called “Earth to Echo”) went through it on a franchise project produced by Michael Bay. He was tapped to helm “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows,” only to discover that he had no autonomy. Granted, Green was still wet behind the ears and had no experience with a nine-digit budget or big union crew. But that wasn’t the job, because Bay never expected him to handle everything. Instead, the producer pulled in more experienced professionals to oversee much of the action and visual effects, while Green followed orders and worked his magic with the actors.

You can bet Tom Cruise’s paycheck that the same thing happened on “The Mummy,” in which Alex Kurtzman is listed as director, but the producer-star was reportedly calling most of the shots. How appropriate that a Universal monster movie reboot should be the victim of what amounts to a kind of creative Frankenstein effect.

Likewise, Marvel has had more success (both financially and artistically) forcing directors to conform to an inflexible set of aesthetic guidelines than it did when art-house “auteur” Ang Lee experimented with his own ideas on 2003’s “Hulk.” And though Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón is celebrated for the personal touch he brought to the Harry Potter franchise, it was relatively malleable British TV director David Yates whom writer-producer J.K. Rowling approved to direct four more films in the series.

So where does that leave us with “Star Wars”? On one hand, it’s perfectly understandable that the producers would want Trevorrow to direct Episode IX, since he’s already demonstrated his capacity to play along with the producers. Meanwhile, it’s disheartening — but not altogether surprising — that a directorial duo as gifted as Lord and Miller have been fired from the Han Solo film, since they’ve been known to fight for the creative integrity of their vision.

But it’s a loss to the “Star Wars” world, since Lord and Miller’s previous credits demonstrate the kind of unique take they might have brought to the franchise. Warner Bros. trusted the duo enough on “The Lego Movie” to let them poke fun at Batman — arguably the studio’s most precious IP, previously rendered oh-so-serious in the Christopher Nolan trilogy. Lord and Miller’s minifigure Dark Knight was a brooding egomaniac and the funniest thing about that film, so much so that Warners ran with it, producing a spinoff that stretched the joke to feature length.

Sony Pictures Animation (where Lord and Miller made “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs”) was similarly enthusiastic about their input on Spider-Man, greenlighting the pair’s high-attitude idea for an animated movie centered around Miles Morales, the Black Hispanic superhero who took over web-slinging duties after Peter Parker’s death. Though they’re not directing, the script is said to bear their fingerprints — which it seems is exactly what Kennedy and company don’t want on the Han Solo project.

With any luck, Lord and Miller will see the “Star Wars” setback as the opportunity that it is: Rather than being forced to color within the lines of a controlling producer’s vision, they can potentially explore the more individual (dare I say, “auteurist”?) instinct they so clearly possess on a less-protected property. Heck, maybe Sony’s Spider-Man project will be the one to benefit. Or perhaps they’ll be in the enviable position of pitching an original movie. Not all directors have such a strong or clear sense of vision that they can be trusted to exert it over a massive studio tentpole, but Lord and Miller are among the few actively reshaping the comedy landscape. Now is their moment, although as Han Solo would say, “Great, kid. Don’t get cocky.”

Related stories'Star Wars' Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Firing Is Latest in Long Line of Director Exits'Star Wars' Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Fired After Clashing With Kathleen Kennedy (Exclusive)'Star Wars' Han Solo Film Loses Directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robbie Amell, Stephen Amell Producing, Starring in ‘Code 8’ Sci-Fi Movie

Robbie Amell, Stephen Amell Producing, Starring in ‘Code 8’ Sci-Fi Movie
Principal photography has begun in Toronto on the crowdfunded sci-fi thriller “Code 8,” starring cousins Robbie Amell and Stephen Amell with Jeff Chan directing.

The Amells raised $1,722,409 from 20,201 backers last year on crowdfunding site Indiegogo for “Code 8” and are executive producing. The 30-day campaign had an original goal of $200,000. The campaign included the release of a ten-minute short film, directed by Chan from a script he co-wrote with Chris Pare.

The film also stars Sung Kang of the “Fast and the Furious” franchise, Kari Matchett (“Maudie”), Greg Bryk (“Frontier”) and Aaron Abrams (“Hannibal”).

Code 8” is set in a world where 4% of the population is born with varying supernatural abilities, but instead of being billionaires or superheroes, most “specials” face discrimination and live in poverty, often resorting to crime in a world now carefully monitored by drones, guardians, and the police. Robbie Amell’s character is struggling to pay
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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